Explosion Proof LED Lights
Explosion Proof Lights

Sources of Ignition for Explosion Proof LED Lights at Industrial Sites

Explosion proof LED fixtures offer protection in flammable environments. Depending on the location the units are installed in, sources of ignition may vary. For instance, combustible facilities with heavy machinery are prone to generating hot surfaces (without proper cooling or ventilation at the site), which at high temperatures could set off volatile substances.

Below takes a closer look at different types of sources of ignition for explosion proof lamps.

Sparks and Electrical

Sparks are one of the most common sources of ignition for explosion proof LED lights. This is the main reason why such fixtures are protected by non-sparking materials, such as polycarbonate, non-sparking metals and hard plastic. At industrial locations, sparks arise from various sources. Damaged rotating components in heavy-duty machines, lack of lubrication and faulty cutting devices are examples of spark-related sources.

Electrical sources of ignition are directly related with explosion proof LED lamps. In order to address this, the units are thoroughly sealed to contain electrical sparks inside the fixture, where it cannot interact with flammable substances in the air.

Hot Surfaces and Gases

Hot surfaces are associated with abnormal operating conditions inside combustible locations. In most cases, the risk of interactions with flammable materials arises when the temperature cannot be controlled. With this in mind, hot surfaces are generated in the event of equipment malfunction, energy fluctuations and more. For explosion proof LED lamps, hot surfaces are less of an issue compared to other sources of ignition. This is because the units are extremely energy efficient, stable and do not produce large amounts of heat during use.

Like hot surfaces, hot gases may also become sources of ignition. This type is considered to be more dangerous because gases are versatile. Sealed enclosures from explosion proof lights help prevent hot gases from either exiting or entering the unit.

To purchase explosion proof lights online visit LarsonElectronics.com

machine vision lights
Work Lights

LED Illumination Methods for Machine Vision Lights

Machine vision lights require accurate and robust illumination. Typically installed close to the target object, LED fixtures are currently the lighting system of choice for such applications. The placement of the LED lamps dictate how the light is casted on the object. LED illumination methods covered below include full bright field, partial bright field and dark field lighting techniques.

Full Bright Field Configuration

Full bright field is applicable to machine vision operations when the sample requires multi-directional illumination. A common setup entails the use of a dome accessory, which diffuses the light beams for maximum reflectivity. Furthermore, the LED lamp must be positioned close to the target (but does not have to be pointed directly at the sample), with the sides of the dome serving as a reflector. By comparison, a flat diffuse configuration incorporates a straight diffusing accessory.

For detecting object orientation and inconsistencies (quality assurance), LED back lighting is the preferred technique. A colored LED light, such as blue, green or red, may be used by the operator for distinguishing markings on labels. Flexibility is introduced to LED machine vision lights when the units are equipped with several lighting features. For example, an LED light bar may offer high-color temperature white light, with an optional red beam that can be toggled.

Partial Bright and Dark Field Illumination

Partial bright field illumination utilizes traditional illumination methods. An LED spotlight is applied to the sample, in the same way individuals point a flashlight at an object. This lighting technique is effective for producing contrast and inspecting detail on the surface of the sample.

In machine vision, dark field illumination refers to angled lighting methods, which can be directional, linear or circular. Glare reduction is one of the greatest benefits of dark field illumination, due to the way light is reflected away from the monitoring device (camera).

Industrial Tank Monitoring with LED
Work Lights

Improving Industrial Tank Monitoring with LED Lights and Sensors

Monitoring storage tanks in industrial facilities must be conducted on a regular, sometimes frequent basis. For locations with numerous tanks at the site, such as food processing buildings and storage silos, this can become an issue. Workers are required to do rounds around the operating floor, taking note of various meter readings and documenting the status of the materials or goods inside the chambers. The installation of LED lights, as well as sensors and cameras can boost such meticulous tasks associated with tank maintenance, inspection and daily operation.

Tank Monitoring Lights

Tank monitoring is supported by powerful lighting systems. Compact LED lights can be mounted on the side of the tank, with the light pointed downwards, into the chamber. Alternatively, the lamps may be positioned to illuminate sensors or level readings, which measure the tank’s contents.

Depending on the type of materials being stored, lights used for tank monitoring should be explosion proof to accommodate combustible environments. Furthermore, waterproof housings are common for tanks that store liquids.

Implementing Sensors and Cameras

Ultrasonic sensors are effective for wireless monitoring of tanks and containers. The units work by taking measurements at specific times during the day or night, automatically recording the readings for logging, research and monitoring.

Various settings can be configured, so that in the event of abnormal occurrences, such as overflow, rapid fluctuations in temperatures and more, the sensor may trigger an alarm system to notify plant managers in real-time. Moreover, the alarm system may come with an Leds or stack light for immediate notification around the site for nearby workers.

Remote viewing of tanks is facilitated by cameras. With such equipment in place, supervisors have the option to monitor multiple tanks at once – even located in different rooms. This makes tank management less demanding and reactions to emergencies much faster.

Work Bench Lights
Uncategorized

Best LED Alternatives for Industrial Work Bench Lights

In industrial sites, work bench lighting consists of a long tube-style lamp, mounted over a bench or desk. The light is typically mounted very low in an elevated position. This type of setup is designed for detailed tasks, such as electronics repair, finishing touches, painting and meticulous wiring. These days, with the era of LEDs in full force, operators have a variety of options and LED alternatives for work bench lighting.

LED Pivot Lamps

An LED pivot lamp is a cutting-edge luminary with a pivot arm that is mounted on the wall. Similar to a retractable dentist fixture, the unit is extremely versatile. This type of fixture is useful for tasks that require high levels of concentration and dexterity, as it allows individuals to position the light very close to target.

Furthermore, for work sites that cannot cater to a lengthy tube light (due to space issues), an LED pivot lamp is a great alternative. After using the light, individuals may fold the arm and bring it close to the wall, away from tools and activities on the table. By comparison, an overhead work bench light is prone to accidental and rough contact.

LED String Lights

LED string lights are also a suitable alternative for work bench illumination. This type of unit includes several LED lamps (around 5-10, depending on the requirements of the space), which are connected together via a cord. A major advantage to LED string lights is custom lighting installations.

Individuals can setup the lamps individually, prioritizing specific parts of the table where work is frequently conducted. When mounted on hooks, string lights become portable. Should an operator need to light up an area close to the work bench, one can unhook the lamp and pull it towards the target (as long as the cord is long enough).

Lighting Options

Car Headlight Safety And Maintenance Tips

Going for a drive after dark? When you’re hitting the road for a nighttime ride, it’s vital to your safety—and the safety of those you’re sharing the road with—that you can clearly see where you’re going and what’s ahead of you. If you can’t see far ahead of you, if your headlights aren’t illuminating a wide area, or if you’re having to keep flicking your high beams on and off to get a better view of the road, it’s quite possible that your headlights need maintenance or even replacement. Fortunately, dealing with headlight issues is affordable and relatively simple, and it’s a great way to ensure you’re driving safely at night.

Make sure you know about the different options you have when choosing headlights, the best ways to keep them clean and well-maintained, and how to know when it’s time to replace them.

The Different Types of Headlights

There are various types of headlights, and they all have different properties. Generally speaking, you get what you pay for, and you’re much more likely to have powerful, long-lasting headlights in a new luxury SUV than you are in an older, used car. The good news is, once you become an educated headlight consumer, you can choose to upgrade.

The cheapest, most common headlights are made with halogen. The light they emit usually has a yellow tint, and they don’t shine as bright or reach as far as other, pricier headlights.

High Intensity Discharge (HID) and Light-Emitting Diode (LED) headlights are more bright and have a whiter color to their light, and they can provide greater visibility when you’re driving in the dark. They use less energy than halogen lights, but they’re more expensive. Sometimes, the glare from these brighter headlights can be distracting or uncomfortable for oncoming drivers.

Optimal Headlight Maintenance

There’s a few simple habits you can get into to help keep your headlights shining bright and lasting long. Make sure you give them a good scrub whenever you wash your car or wipe down your windshield—dirt and road dust that builds up on them can reduce visibility and increase glare.

Check your bulbs regularly. If they’re cracked or cloudy, it’s time to replace them. Make sure you include your brake lights in your bulb inspections.

You also need to make sure your headlights aren’t out of alignment. Rough roads, impacts, and sudden stops can cause your headlights to become misaligned. Your auto mechanic can get them pointed in the right direction and ensure you’re safely lighting up the road ahead of you.

When It’s Replacement Time

Over time, halogen bulbs will naturally start to grow dimmer. If you’ve noticed this occurring, or if you’re having difficulty clearly seeing the road before you at night, it’s time to replace your headlights—don’t wait for them to burn out.

When one bulb needs replacing, you should go ahead and replace both of them. This way they’ll both be at the same level of bulb life and brightness. Uneven lighting can impair your visibility.

Replacing headlight bulbs on your own is a manageable do-it-yourself project for most auto enthusiasts, but you can always visit a mechanic or dealership you like to have it done for you.

Driving at night with dim or burned out headlights is extremely dangerous, and the consequences can be devastating. Make sure you practice good headlight care and maintenance so that you can get them replaced before you find yourself in a perilous situation.

Low Voltage LED Lights
Work Lights

Class 2 Compliance for Low Voltage LED Lights

During construction, installation for LED lighting systems must carefully observe various safety guidelines set forth by the National Electric Code (NEC). For low voltage LED lights, such as wiring, compliance with Class 2 guidelines are recommended.

The standards are designed to reduce risks surrounding fires, shocks and premature lighting failure.

Power and Electrical Wiring

Class 2 regulations for low voltage luminaries must adhere to specific performance standards. When it comes to power supplies, the low voltage 12V DC driver should be 60 watts or lower. Furthermore, 24V DC drivers should operate at 96 watts or lower. As a refresher, a low voltage LED work lights are stepped down from a standard AC voltage (such as 120V AC) to a low, DC voltage (usually 12V DC or 24V DC).

When a Class 1 circuit and a Class 2 circuit are utilized, the components should be separated, according to NEC guidelines. A solution to this concern is the application of a heavy-duty junction box.

Class 2 electric wiring for permanent lighting installations supersede mainstream rubber-based coatings commonly found in mainstream appliances. This requirement is critical because wiring for permanent installations are typically hidden behind walls. If the wiring components are surrounded by insulation, they could be prone to excessive heat generation.

Labeling and Inspections

Streamlining Class 2 compliance can be done by checking the labels of power supplies and wiring components during purchase. In fact, inspectors generally look for markings from an authorized regulator (NRTL) to ensure compliance. Examples of popular NRTLs include UL and ETL.

To avoid delays during inspection and construction, individuals should be ready to provide a wiring diagram for the intended lighting installation. This is usually a requirement in the permit process. Checking for Class 2 compliance is conducted on low voltage lighting units during the rough-in (initial) inspection process.

Industrial LED Light Towers
light towers

Key Tips for Maintaining Industrial LED Light Towers

LED light towers are exposed to a wide range of harmful elements. At mining sites, roadsides and petrol processing facilities, this could include crippling winds, corrosive rain and rough handling during transportation.

Because of the way LED light masts are used at industrial sites, it is crucial to keep them maintained and in proper working condition. In most cases, this requires monitoring key parts in the portable lighting system.

Bulbs and Housings

Bulbs are usually the main component that gets the most attention, when it comes to light tower maintenance. But because LED units come with 50,000+ hours of operation, businesses do not have to prioritize such traditional requirements. It is important to consider that some LED bulbs cannot be replaced, forcing individuals to replace the entire fixture.

The light tower’s housing should also be cleaned after heavy use. Accumulation of oil and debris around the unit can reduce lighting efficiency. Moreover, heat from light towers may cause oily residue on the masts to burn at high temperatures. LEDs can reduce such risks, due to their low operating temperatures and decreased energy consumption.

Light Tower Engines

Some LED light towers are equipped with fuel-powered generators for portable use. These types of lighting systems need to be carefully maintained. Fluids need to be kept at standard levels and safety mechanisms, such as the automatic shutdown feature, should be periodically tested for reliability. To streamline this aspect of maintenance, operators may consider purchasing an LED light tower with an easily accessible engine, via side panels.

For businesses that want a cleaner alternative, a solar-powered LED light tower is recommended. This option does not require meticulous fluid maintenance. However, operators must monitor battery charging and operating times closely for optimized power cell performance. A charger controller can be applied to automate such needs.

Construction Lights

Remote Ballast Configurations for Metal Halide Fixtures in High Heat Environments

Industrial work sites that experience high temperatures on a regular basis need adequate hazardous area lighting for safety. The problem is, extreme heat can damage conventional lamps commonly used in rugged facilities. For metal halide fixtures, this is a serious issue. Some of the lamp’s components, including the ballast, are easily prone to damage and can contribute to premature failure – when internal losses become excessive (above 5-30 percent of the unit’s wattage).

 

Remote Ballasts

 

In metal halide lighting systems, ballasts are used to regulate current during startup. It provides the required voltage for the creation of an arc between the electrodes. When this component is exposed to high heat or other crippling conditions, the ballast is unable to control the current at the required standard for smooth operation.

 

As a result, the metal halide fixture may flicker or fail to produce quality illumination (weak light beams or low color temperature settings). To address such concerns, operators may choose to install the ballast in a separate location. This remote configuration allows the ballast to thrive in cooler environments, while the lamp is directly exposed to the high-heat work site.

 

In addition to heat, remote ballast setups can decrease the negative effects of harmonics (from nearby equipment).

 

Magnetic vs Electronic Ballasts

 

For metal halide lamps, there are two main types of ballasts utilized in industrial buildings: magnetic and electronic. Out of the two options, magnetic ballasts are the most commonly used, which regulates current using a magnetic coil. This type of ballast is capable of reducing flicker and occurrences of premature failure.

 

Electronic ballasts are suitable for metal halide lighting systems above 1,000 watts. Compared to traditional magnetic variants, this type is more energy efficient and offers stable output. From a performance perspective, electronic ballasts can improve light uniformity and support reliable illumination at the end of the lamp’s general lifecycle.

LED Options for Courtesy Lights on Boats
Marine Lighting

LED Options for Courtesy Lights on Boats

On the water, boats utilize different types of lights for illumination. For inspections, LED light bars or mounted LED spotlights are typically used. These types of luminaries are reliable, but could be too powerful for illuminating the inside of the vessel. Task lighting around and inside the boat requires smaller, more compact units. These type of marine fixtures are called LED courtesy lights. Keep reading to learn more about the important roles that the luminaries take on inside vessels and marine environments.

Discreet LED Boat Lights

LED courtesy lights can be found in sections of the boat that experience moderate activity, such as a gathering area or the steering station (to illuminate controls). Furthermore, they are designed to guide operators around hazards, including staircases or railings. As temporary lighting options, the units do not have to be extremely bright. The lights should not overpower navigation lights around the vessel.

To prevent blinding, it is recommended to install the LED lights with the beam pointing downwards or in a horizontal configuration. Low-color temperature units offer discreet illumination, which is recommended so that there is a distinction from the boat’s navigation lights. Essentially, the luminaries should be waterproof and corrosion resistant.

Installation and Features

This type of LED boat light is versatile, capable of catering to installations in tight spaces. Slim, puck-style units can be placed under seating areas, inside cabinets or overhead (with the beam pointing downwards). For path lighting, the luminaries can also be setup close to the ground with sturdy casings to prevent damage from rough contact.

When used for illuminative safety, the lights can be equipped with motion sensors or timers. The components are only suitable for hazardous, low-activity sections of the boat. Installing motion sensors or timers in high-activity parts of the vessel may lead to frequent activation.

lighting systems
Lighting For Traffic

FHWA Lighting Systems Recommendations for Roadways and Temporary Work Zones

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) oversees the wide-scale implementation of lighting systems for streets, road construction, temporary work zones and railroad crossings across the US.

When it comes to work zones, defined as a non-permanent work site that takes place on the road or close to it, the guidelines set forth by the agency provide several tips for improving illumination and safety.

Illuminance Levels

Due to the presence of pedestrians and drivers around public work zones, operators cannot deploy extremely bright fixtures at the site. Furthermore, certain lighting systems, such as light towers, should not be pointed at angles exceeding 65 degrees. Failing to adhere to this recommendation may cause unwanted light spillage, resulting in the creation of glare or blinding (when light beams are directed at passing cars).

For dangerous and detailed tasks, including pothole filling, 216 lux of illumination is recommended by the FHWA. Moderately complex works, such as paving or milling, should be supplemented with a light source that is capable of providing 108 lux. Low-risk tasks, which includes sweeping, surveying and deployment of construction equipment, require at least 54 lux of illumination for temporary work zones.

Conditions for Non-Permanent Road Lighting

According to the FHWA, certain conditions must be met in order to validate the use of temporary lighting systems on roads. When fixed, existing lighting structures are not working or must be removed to make room for the task, regulators recommend deploying temporary fixtures.

Moreover, when safety barriers and pylons are obstructed, lamps should be utilized to illuminate the section of the road. In most cases, one can find temporary lighting systems at non-permanent roadway projects that are supplemented with detours. The fixtures are usually directed at signs and dangerous sections of the work zone. For comprehensive illumination, the FHWA recommends the use of portable light towers which can be found here http://www.larsonelectronics.com/c-189-light-towers.aspx